Specialty Tracks

Specialty Tracks in Emergency Medicine Education (STEME) are pre-designed pathways to utilize those faculty with additional/fellowship training, or substantial experience in an area of Emergency Medicine. Such tracks include:

  1. Toxicology (Dr. Christina Hantsch, Faculty Track Director)
  2. EMS (Dr. Mark Cichon, Faculty Track Director)
  3. Sports Medicine (Dr. Jolie Holschen, Faculty Track Director)
  4. Medical Education (Dr. Trent Reed, Faculty Track Director)
  5. Ultrasound (Dr. Amy Kule, Faculty Track Director)
  6. Pediatrics (Dr. Simon Ros, Faculty Track Director)
  7. Administration (Dr. Robert Riggs, Faculty Track Director)
  8. Global Medicine (Dr. Theresa Nguyen, Faculty Track Director)

Through discussion and mentoring, we will work to find those residents with an interest in one of these areas, and look to assign them to a STEME Track Director after January of their intern year. The Track Director will supervise and monitor both didactic and clinical resident education within their area of expertise.

Here is an example of the goals for one of these tracks, the Education STEME:

The goals of the Medical Education Specialty Track:

  • To develop skills in curriculum development and innovative educational delivery and produce at least 1 form of instructional material.
  • To develop skills in teaching, mentoring, and career advising medical students.
  • To gain skills in evaluation and assessment of students and participate in mid-clerkship feedback for rotating medical students at least once per year.
  • To gain knowledge in research and dissemination through at least 1 scholarly work.
  • Share best practices in medical education with others by delivering at least 1 journal club related to medical education
  • To prepare and provide interested residents with the prerequisites necessary to match in an ACGME approved fellowship in medical education

 

Loyola EMS

The EMS program at Loyola University Medical Center was one of the original three resource hospitals recognized in Illinois in 1977. Since that time it has grown to the largest single resource hospital EMS system in the State. Our EMS providers range from volunteer first responders to critical care flight medics and everything in between. Our system is comprised of municipal, private, contract, and non-transport programs whose members number over 3000, and provide services to over 110,000 patients per year. Educators within the EMS system provide over 400 hours of CME to its members monthly.

What does this mean to you as a resident? This background provides a rich opportunity to gain insight and experience in all aspects of EMS; management, policy development, protocol refinement, SOP development, education delivery and diverse patient care modeling.

Whether core content, a self-developed elective, or the STEME track – the availability to learn and experience EMS within our Emergency medicine Residency awaits you at Loyola.

Please visit the Loyola EMS website for more information.